Warner’s Log Cabin Remedies (Part I)

By 1887, H. H. Warner was hitting his stride as his patent medicine empire was flourishing around the world. Grover Cleveland was in his first term in the White House and the coming Panic of 1893 was but a spectre on the distant horizon. In that year, Warner introduced a new major line of medicines that he dubbed “Log Cabin Remedies.”  Undoubtedly, these Log Cabin Remedies were designed to appeal to an American public smitten with westward expansion and the apparently limitless possiblities for America’s manifest destiny.

The Log Cabin Remedies came packaged in a colorful red, white, blue and yellow container and included Log Cabin Sarsparilla, Hops & Buchu Remedy, Cough & Consumption Remedy, Extract, Rose Cream, Hair Tonic, Scalpine, Plasters and  Liver Pills. The pills sold for 25 cents, the Rose Cream for 50 cents and the remaining large sized Remedies for $1.00. In addition, the Cough & Consumption Remedy and Extract came in a small size for 50 cents. The base of the amber bottles bore the embossing “PAT’D SEPT. 9 87”.

I have included two back covers from the 1890 and 1892 Warner’s Safe Almanacs that featured Log Cabin Remedies. It is interesting to note that Warner makes the explicit disclaimer that “We Do Not Cure All Diseases From One Bottle.” That would appear to suggest that the consumer should expect to invest in more than one bottle and perhaps more than one variety of Log Cabin Remedies. Also, take a close look at the detail of the Hops & Buchu Remedy label. It says:

The Most Radical Opponents of

Alcoholic Beverages

 Can Use This Remedy as it is a

 MEDICAL PREPARATION

NOT A BEVERAGE

Sounds like Warner was even making a play for those confirmed teetotalers in the market. He never missed an angle.

Advertisements

2 thoughts on “Warner’s Log Cabin Remedies (Part I)

    • Joan,
      I really don’t know who the eight doctors mentioned in the article are. Since most of his newspaper ads took great license, it may be just puffery.

      Steve

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s